Andrew P Watson

Web Developer

Possible 18th century New England card table??!?

Mon, 01/04/2010 - 19:00

I just acquired this from close (and slightly mental) friend of mine. He is dealing with some family estate items and gave it to me because he knew I really liked it. I’ve been a big antique roadshow fan for years, and anyone that has seen that show has heard of the infamous “card table” that turned out being one of the highest valued pieces they had.

Now, I’m not claiming this is one of them. The thing is, my friend said the appraiser took a quick look at it, got “very” interested. She said it was most likely an authentic late 1700s antique table. I know a little about these things, but not enough to claim I have anything extraordinary. I’m not sure I would sell it even so, I really like how it looks and would want to keep it in the family.

I can say with certainty, this came out an authentic 18th century Newburyport farmhouse. It was a farmhouse on a local farm run by the same family since 1683. The house is literally a museum of authentic, pristine colonial and federal relics. This table was just one of three similar tables my friend has.

I just got it, and it needs to be cleaned up a bit. It’s been in an empty house for a long time. I’m not sure how to even clean something like this. I don’t want to hurt the finish.

Very detailed inlay all around the edges:

Antique card table

New England card table

Top opens up and leg slides around behind:

Antique sharaton table

Very cool, rough hinges. I assume brass. I read somewhere that you check the screws on a piece like this to see if the notch is inconsistent, or off center. It shows they were not mass-produced and helps to date/authenticate the item. These screws are all a little different with the notch off-center on many:

18th century card table

Portsmouth card table

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